Summer School 2017 – June 7th – 16th

SummerSchool2017

We’re delighted with the line-up of sessions the team has put together for this year’s Technology Enhanced Learning Summer School. As well as our regular introductory sessions we’ll be looking at classroom polling technologies, getting started with Twitter for HE, tools and tips for visual presentations in lectures, introducing you to the new version of PebblePad, and our Multimedia Network will be meeting. It’s the final hurrah for our series of workshops on Turnitin and Blackboard Assignments which support the University’s policy on electronic submission so book in quick if you want to attend one of these (but don’t panic, these will return in revised guises next academic year).

The complete schedule follows below. This year, for bookings please email eddev @ liv.ac.uk if there are any sessions you want to attend. Full descriptions for each session are available on the CLL booking page here. You can also book from this page, but please bear in mind that this year bookings are being managed by email, so clicking the ‘book here’ link generates an email with the subject filled in with the workshop you want to attend.

2017 Summer School Schedule

Wednesday 7th June (13:00 – 15:00) – VITAL Essentials – Entry-level practical session on using VITAL also covering the VITAL Baseline, copyright and accessibility.

Wednesday 7th June (13:30 – 16:00) – An introduction to technology-enhanced learning. Looks at the technologies we have available centrally at Liverpool, their applications for learning and teaching, and highlights policy, strategy and guidelines relating to TEL. Reflect on your digital capabilities and that of your students within the context of your own discipline.

Monday 12th June (13:30 – 15:30) – Engaging Learners visually in lectures – tools, tips and tricks. Examining principles of communication and good design for the presentation materials we use in lectures. We will explore sharing approaches and tools that allow you to make engaging slides in PowerPoint, access Creative Commons images, and present data in appealing and engaging ways.

Tuesday 13th June (10:00 – 12:00) –  Multimedia Network – Production of Video in HE. NB This is not a training session. This is a usergroup network meeting and discussion on the use of video in education. See note below about contact details for joining this session.

Tuesday 13th June (13:30 – 15:30) – VITAL online tests – an introduction. We introduce the tool through the whole life cycle of running online tests via VITAL. The session will include practical experience of creating and managing tests and analysing test results, as well as taking a test from the student’s point of view.

Wednesday 14th June (10:00 – 12:00) – PebblePad – an introduction. Pebblepad is the University’s online system for a range of activities such as portfolios and student placements. This summer Pebblepad will be getting upgraded to Version 5 which will update the look and feel, become mobile friendly and have increased functionality. This session will introduce users to the new features and identify different ways the system can be used.

Wednesday 14th June (12:00 – 14:00) – The Turnitin Assignment tool for e-submission (part 1) and GradeMark for feedback (part 2). A practical session looking at how you set up and manage coursework submissions through the Turnitin Assignment tool (part 1) and how you can offer feedback electronically (part 2) using GradeMark. Stay for either or both parts of this session.

Wednesday 14th June (14:30 – 16:30) – The Blackboard Assignment tool for e-submission (part 1) and feedback (part 2). A practical session looking at how you set up and manage coursework submissions through the Blackboard Assignment tool (part 1) and how you can offer feedback electronically (part 2) using Inline Grader. Stay for either or both parts of this session.

Thursday 15th June (10:00 – 12:00) – Classroom Polling Technologies. A look at some of the classroom polling systems widely available and their applications. NB this session will use technologies and software which are currently not available centrally through CSD, but you will be shown low cost or free (but limited) systems which you can use in your teaching.

Thursday 15th June (13:30 – 15:30) – Wikis and blogs in VITAL. This practical workshop introduces using the VITAL wiki and blog tools. We will look at some case studies of the use of these tools for learning and teaching, as well as their built-in assessment and tracking facilities. 

Friday 16th June (10:00 – 12:00) – An introduction to Twitter in Higher Education. This session will provide an overview of the tool, demonstrate examples of how it is used in teaching to support learning, event hashtags and sharing of information.

Friday 16th June (13:30 – 15:30) – Stream Capture for screencasting, lecture capture and podcasting. Key concepts, practical considerations, examples and case studies, and how Stream Capture can be used in these contexts.

All of the workshops are listed on our booking site linked to here.

The main pre-requisite for the summer school sessions (apart from the introductory workshops) is that you are familiar with VITAL and using its main facilities, but please contact us if you want to discuss the suitability of any of the sessions. You are welcome to book on as many sessions as you wish, although we would ask that if you find yourself unable to attend to unenrol as soon as possible.

Please also remember that we are able to run tailored workshops for schools and departments (with a minimum of five attendees). Get in touch with the eLearning Unit to discuss this option.

Dan

Multimedia Network – Production of Video in HE – Usergroup meeting

This network and discussion on the use of video in education is aimed at staff working on all scales within the University, who either have direct involvement in Multimedia creation or have access to a team that create educational resources. We will look at a series of video resources, considering them in the context of the institution’s goals, before looking at what ‘free’ editing software exists on the internet to help achieve quality products that aid learning. Before this meeting you are asked to fill out a ‘pre session’ idea map that will help generate discussion for the start of the session.

If you’re keen to work together with a small group to improve the multimedia output of the institution then this Network group could be for you. We will have more meetings coming up. Feel free to email phil walker (pwalker1 @ liv. ac .uk)  for more details.

Telling Stories: ULMS Social Media and External Engagement workshop

Social Media 01

Supriya Garikapti attended one of the eLearning Unit’s CPD sessions on the Use of Twitter in Higher Education. She contacted me soon after and asked if I’d like to share some of my work at an upcoming Social Media and External Engagement impact workshop in the Management School. I was only too happy to oblige. You can view my presentation here which is entitled Twitter Top Tips.

The basis for the workshop was to share a wide range of good practice from colleagues across the school. A great deal of work is already underway regarding maintaining the excellent standing of the school in the upcoming REF assessment in 2021. It is with the knowledge that Lord Nicholas Sterns’s recent recommendations look likely to guide the shape of the next assessment exercise that I’ve highlighted the three impact recommendations below:

Recommendation 5: Institutions should be given more flexibility to showcase their interdisciplinary and collaborative impacts by submitting ‘institutional’ level impact case studies, part of a new institutional level assessment.

Recommendation 6: Impact must be based on research of demonstrable quality. However, case studies could be linked to a research activity and a body of work as well as to a broad range of research outputs.

Recommendation 7: Guidance on the REF should make it clear that impact case studies should not be narrowly interpreted, need not solely focus on socio-economic impacts but should also include impact on government policy, on public engagement and understanding, on cultural life, on academic impacts outside the field, and impacts on teaching.

There is increasing evidence of the value of blogging about your work and sharing it to wider audience via social media channels such as Twitter. There are also plenty of handy tips to get you started and help you effectively promote your work. The eLearning Unit regularly run sessions on social media such as An Introduction to Twitter and Getting more out of Twitter. Get in touch with the eLearning Unit in the Centre for Innovation in Education to find out more. Right, that’s enough advertising!

HSS Press Officer Matt Hurst kindly didn’t speak to a PowerPoint presentation which allowed my #LIVUNISOCIAL event advert to gain maximum exposure! (I promise that’s the last advert!)

#LIVUNISOCIAL presentation slide

Matt informed the audience about the role of the Press Office in supporting staff to make the most of their press contacts, brokering relationships with major media outlets, providing media training for academic staff, as well as providing useful advice if things go wrong on social media. In the context of the events theme, visibility on news, radio and television is considered a pathway to impact and may be looked on favourably in the REF submission. To that end, they are in the process of setting up a state of the art broadcast suite in partnership with Globelynx.

Following on from this was Paul Sapple, Public Engagement With Research manager for the University. He impressed upon the gathered attendees the importance of impact and the support he provides in helping staff along that pathway.  He shared with us some of Supriya’s recent research its impact. The case study focused on empowering young girls in India to understand and manage their fertility.

Jennifer Johns shared her experiences of writing about Brexit for the online publication the The Conversation. For those unfamiliar with the name, it is an independent source of news and views, sourced from the academic and research community and is publicly accessible online. Contributions from the University of Liverpool are high with over 130 academics and researchers. Publishing in this way opened up opportunities to further increase impact as it led to work on BBC radio and Slovak TV. The article was widely shared across blogs and Twitter and while this was a pleasing when looking at the analytics (1700 views), she stated that once published here it’s no longer in your hands. The drawback to wiring a piece on a contentious topic is the comments she received on the site. Comments on websites sometimes bring out the keyboard warriors and trolls who are only in it for the “lulz”.

My knowledge of the intricacies of the tariffs applied to the sale of alcohol in Canada increased tenfold after hearing about the internationally recognised work of Andrew Smith. He didn’t seem to need to use social media for impact, as his work was widely reported in the Canadian press as part of a major legal case. However, he continued to help keep the story alive on his regularly updated blog https://pastspeaks.com/

As the audience dwindled due teaching commitments, many people will have missed  what was certainly my favourite presentation of the afternoon. Nick Papageorgiadis shared how he used the openness and immediacy of Twitter to promote the research in his subject area: research on national Intellectual Property (IP).  He developed a new index that measures the strength of patent systems of 49 countries, annually, for the years 1998-2015. The index was published at the Journal of World Business and the scores and latest updates of the index are available on this website. His approach to using Twitter was very focused. He identified a clear audience for his work, only posted and responded to questions on his research and when retweeting the work of others, he always posted a short comment about the article. In particular, certain retweets of his work have driven traffic to his patent systems website, significantly so in Australia and Finland where his work has informed governmental reports. Summing up he suggested there are many pro’s to using Twitter. It’s very useful to share the work you have done and if used alongside a website, you can easily track the impact of your tweets. Having it all online aids the evidence collection process. According to Nick, there is a price to pay for working in this way. He states that it took some time to get started and maintain a presence on Twitter, and that the workload allocation model does not distinguish this activity as teaching or scholarship. This begs the question when will we get to a stage where our work activity on Social Media is recognised and supported?

Alex

Winter School 2017 report

winter-school‘Brilliant, engaging, authentic – thank you!’

This year’s Winter School, our sixth, has been the best attended of any we have run so far which was really pleasing for the team. We’ve met lots of new colleagues over the two weeks and been inspired by the kinds of things people want to do with technologies for their learning and teaching. Feedback from the sessions has given us some great ideas on how to develop our workshops and also the kinds of things people would like to find out more about, that’s why we collect it, so we’ll be scheduling in workshops on Evernote and technologies for polling over the next few months for starters. To keep up to date with when workshops are running you can follow us on Twitter (link below), follow us on this blog, keep an eye on the University Announcements page and also search the CLL Booking page here.

‘Lots of showing and sharing of experiences – colleagues sharing their use of various tools… Learning about those tools and trying them out.’

Our aim is to make the Winter and Summer schools a mix of introductory and more exploratory sessions, providing opportunities for staff to extend themselves. In the feedback we get, staff report a valued feature of the sessions is the opportunity to try out new tools and systems, to discuss the strengths and limits of these, how these can be trialed and then made a part of learning and teaching practice, and to share and learn from what colleagues in other schools and departments are interested in and are doing. We are also delighted to read about the wider impact and reach our sessions have in a range of contexts, from enriching personal practice, to staff championing in schools and departments the ideas and knowledge they gain, to applications for research groups.

‘I came to build up professional knowledge and skills for my own personal development and I think this will definitely come in useful in the future.’

‘This will quickly enable myself and other module leaders to elevate the skills of our students…’

Immediate use to help a research collaboration (2 UK sites, 2 European) meet and collaborate. I will include this system as a way of indicating how we will collaborate – thus strengthening a bid for funding. I will explore using this for T&L in a European meeting to demonstrate some of our T&L content.’

Another way we’ve responded to the feedback we get has been developing an advanced session on using Twitter, following a brace of well attended introductory Twitter sessions over the summer. We ran this in the winter school and knowing that it is crucial to include local examples of good practice we enlisted the help of Zelda Chatten, who is part of the team that supports the Library’s social media presence. Between us we were able to share practical tips and useful advice about our experiences using Twitter.

This was a fruitful partnership which extended the range of sessions we run collaboratively (we also run an Adobe Connect session with colleagues from CSD) and one which we will repeat and continue to build on, for example we are planning to develop a session jointly-run with CSD colleagues on Stream Capture.

‘The opportunity to explore some very useful tools in a supported way – I left with some great ways to make my slides more visual and engaging and will pass these tips onto others.’

It was also the first time we ran the session ‘Engaging learners visually’ in which Alex and Tünde shared a few tools that you can use to create more exciting, visual slides, including Notegraphy, Piktochart, Prezi, Haikudeck and some features of PowerPoint. We discussed accessibility considerations when putting together pictoral slides. Judging from the attendance and busy keyboard-working during the workshop, it was a lively and useful topic to cover!  We will definitely run this workshop again.

‘Hands-on guidance through the set-up, recording, stream process. Also love the well-scaffolded and visual resources laid out on the VITAL page. Great!’

If you attended one of our the Winter School sessions you will be enrolled on our Workshop Resources module in VITAL which will contain at least the slides from the sessions and usually further links and support resources on all of the sessions we run. Our Summer School will be running from Wednesday 7th June until Friday 16th June 2017 and some sessions are already scheduled in to run and are bookable here: https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/cll/booking/

‘Thank you – terrific, inspiring session!’

Thanks to everyone who came along and engaged so positively. We derive much inspiration and learn so much from all of our sessions, which we always strive to make a collaborative venture. But for now, the decorations are stowed back in the loft, the last green triangle Quality Street has reluctantly been scoffed, and the jumper from Santa exchanged for a Star Wars onesie, it can mean only one thing; the eLearning Unit Winter school has been and gone and the festivities over for another year. Hope to see you at the Summer School!

The eLearning Unit team

 

2017 New Year – back to VITAL!

A slightly belated Happy New Year to everyone and in this truly chilly January we hope this post will help defrost VITAL for you, ready for the new term. We’ve put together a checklist with follow-on links and resources on:

  1. Finding a missing VITAL module
  2. Course copy (copying module content from previous/other modules)
  3. The VITAL Baseline
  4. E-submission and e-marking support
  5. Was there anything new in VITAL this year?
  6. Known Issues and Bugs
  7. More help and training for VITAL

1. I can’t see my module in VITAL! Where is it?

If you log in to VITAL and cannot find the module(s) on which you are teaching this coming year in your module list then for most standard taught modules click here for a checklist on how to resolve this problem.

2. How do I copy content over from another module?

The easiest way to copy the bulk of your content from another module (e.g. last year’s version) is to use the Course Copy facility. You need to be at the Instructor level on both the source and destination modules. Here is the latest version of our guide to the course copy process. The screenshot here shows you where to locate this facility on the Control Panel menu. Once on the course copy page do use the Browse button to find the Destination Course ID and do not  select the Include Enrolments in the Copy option (at the bottom of the copy page). There are also some useful tools and tips on course copy below this screenshot.

Course copy – useful Link-checker tool. See all of the weblinks in the copied module content on one page and check whether any are broken so that these can be hidden and/or fixed. Access this from the module’s Control Panel in the Course Tools section. When you click the Link Checker link the tool will start the checking process so there may be a few seconds until the results display.

Course copy – Date-manager tool. See all of the due dates, availability dates and date adaptive release rules for the copied module content on one page and adjust these for the new academic term (also useful if you need to make changes to the schedule of a module during term-time). Again, access this from the Control Panel in the Course Tools section. Click the Date Management link here. Select the List all Dates for Review option at the start of the process to see and adjust dates individually. 

Course copy – Tidy up modules. Course Copy is also an opportunity to think about tidying up modules. For example, does every content area from the older module still need to be copied over? You can specify which sections you want copying and which to leave (and you can always come back and copy individual sections over if it turns out you need them after all). Thinking about the VITAL Baseline, are the sections you have copied over organised in a structure that is easy to navigate for your students and are folders, content areas and files clearly labelled? The VITAL Baseline guide below offers some advice on doing this. A word of caution though, there is no Undo facility in VITAL and if you delete anything it cannot currently be recovered.

Course copy – Video content. Something else to think about is any video content uploaded directly to your module. Firstly, please do not upload any further video content to VITAL modules, it is too large and the way that VITAL works means that students have first to download it before they can view it which can be highly problematic. Instead, where you own the copyright to the video then use the University’s streaming media service to host and to stream the videos. If the video is hosted on another streaming site (YouTube for instance) you can embed it in your VITAL module. For material broadcast on UK television you can use the Box of Broadcasts service and stream full programmes and extracts from here. For video that does not fall into these categories then please contact the eLearning Unit for help. Then for video content that is already in the module please have a chat with CSD technical team about moving your video content out of VITAL and storing and streaming it elsewhere. For advice on copyright of video please see this library guidance site.

Copyright – scanned journal articles/book extracts. One more thing to check for is the copyright status of materials in your module, in particular what to do about journal articles and extracts from books which you have scanned/have previously been scanned from a hard copy and then uploaded to VITAL. If you do have items like this and they have not been uploaded by following the CLA clearing process detailed here (click on the ‘Procedures for VITAL’ section) you need to ensure that these items comply. You can make things easier by using the library’s new digitisation service and offering the resource through Reading Lists @ Liverpool (click the ‘Digitisation Service’ link on the same page). Your liaison librarian can help you with this.

3. What’s the VITAL Baseline again?

Once course copy is completed, check that the module will meet the VITAL Baseline. The Module Overview page link and the Exam Resources section now appear by default in your module menu. You will still need to manually add a link to any Reading Lists @ Liverpool list you have set up for a module. This quick guide to the six elements of the Baseline shows you how to add this link and for you to check your module meets all six elements. There is also a module in VITAL on which you are enrolled ‘VITAL Baseline and guidance’ which takes you through the Baseline in more detail.

You’ll notice another default section in your module called ‘Stream Lectures’. If you are using Stream Capture to record Orbit-timetabled lectures then this is the section of your module where the recordings appear automatically. If you are not then this section will not appear to students (as does any empty module section).

4. What help is available for e-submission and e-marking?

The e-submission project has a regularly-updated project page here which contains some details on how it is managed and what work is going on at the Institutional level to facilitate the e-submission policy. You will also find a list of school/departmental contacts who you can contact about local implementation and approaches. If you would like to attend a workshop where you can find out how to use the tools supported centrally, their uses, limits and feedback contexts then we run monthly e-submission and e-marking days looking at Turnitin and Blackboard Assignment tools (dates below). In the VITAL Baseline and Support module you will also find a section on e-submission and e-feedback tools and workflows, current recommendations and so on. We will also be moving to a new-look Turnitin GradeMark called Feedback Studio and will be running sessions on this in the summer and into the new academic year, as well as providing online support materials. The eLearning Unit will help your school or department plan your approach to e-submission and e-marking, run training sessions for your staff and offer ‘phone and email helpdesk support.

E-submission days.

We run three sessions on one of our e-submission ‘days’. The titles and times they run are:

  • An introduction to e-submission (09:30 – 10:30)
  • The Turnitin Assignment tool for e-submission and GradeMark for feedback (11:00 – 13:00)
  • The Blackboard Assignment Tool For e-submission and feedback (14:00 – 16:00)

And the dates they are running this year are:

  • Weds 22nd Feb
  • Weds 15th March
  • Weds 26th April
  • Weds 14th June

You can book onto any of them at the CLL booking page here.

We also have a set of student guides and videos on submitting work and accessing feedback which are held on this page and which you are welcome to adapt for your own use (please note these pages are currently being redeveloped).

5. Was there anything new in VITAL this year?

No major additions to the toolset were made in the summer upgrade, which was mostly focussed on bug fixes and improvements to the hardware running our installation of VITAL. The Retention Centre was restored and the Self and Peer Assessment tool is now working fully. There were some important new features added to VITAL in the December 2014 upgrade, including a student preview mode,  anonymous marking for Blackboard assignments and delegated marking for Blackboard assignments which allows double marking and moderation of Blackboard Assignments (this does not apply to Turnitin assignments).

From previous upgrades to Turnitin there were a couple of useful enhancements, most importantly the file size limit for student assignments has doubled to 40 MB. You can also directly email late-submitting students from the assignment’s Turnitin classlist.

6. Any problems you can tell me about now?

There is a regularly-updated Known Issues page here which also covers Turnitin and Campus Pack problems. Some of the main current problems are:

  • Tracking statistics reports do not include Mobile app access of modules.
  • Bringing forward the post date of a Turnitin assignment marked with GradeMark  appears to make any final grades entered go missing (in fact they re-appear later on but this is alarming to see).

If you encounter a problem with VITAL which is not listed on the Known Issues page please do report this to the CSD ServiceDesk.

7. Where can I get some more help, training or online resources for VITAL?

Workshops. We’ve just run our 2017 Winter School and are now in the process of scheduling in workshops for the rest of the year. As well our Summer School (7th – 16th June) we’ll be organising a new ‘mini’ Easter School, and yes there will be chocolate eggs. Our e-submission and e-marking days run every month and are all bookable from the CLL booking page here (and see above). If you want a session running for your school or department then please contact us to arrange this as soon as possible.

VITAL Help Module.  All staff are enrolled on the module VITAL Baseline and guidance which has support sections for:

  • how to meet the Baseline standard (and get a basic introduction to VITAL)
  • e-submission and e-marking
  • lecture capture and screencasting

If you come on one of our workshops you will also be enrolled on our workshop resources module which contains further guides, examples, case studies, research and more on the specific sessions that you attend.

Guides. VITAL Self Service has searchable FAQs and Known Issues as well as some useful administrative tools for working with VITAL.This A-Z guides page has functional help on setting up and using the toolset in VITAL. If you don’t see the guide you need just ask us and we’ll find something for you!

Email and ‘phone support. Contact us for advice and help. We also run a bookable Studio Wednesday drop-in.

Is there anyone else out there I can talk to?

As well as the eLearning Unit (we’ll help with how you can use these technologies for your learning and teaching) and CSD Servicedesk (who will deal with all student queries and all technical problems like enrolments, error messages and so on) if you want help with the Reading Lists @ Liverpool tool or digital copyright then please contact your liaison librarian. There is also a University mailing list for people interested in learning technology where you can ask questions and get updates on what is happening with learning technologies around the institution, find out dates of upcoming workshops and e-learning network meetings and other similar groups around the University; get in touch with the eLearning Unit if you want to join.

Dan

Winter School 2017 – Week 2 Workshops – 16th – 20th January

The Winter School began today with a great session on engaging students visually in lectures with loads of ideas for presentation materials. There are a number of other sessions in the first week , which you can read about here and still book the last few places here.

This year we are also running a second week of sessions (Monday 16th to Friday 20th January) looking at technologies for learning and teaching beyond VITAL and a number of which are designed to tie-in with the online Bring Your Own Device for Learning 2017 events. All sessions listed below and bookable at: https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/cll/booking/

  • Monday 16th Jan – An introduction to Twitter (2 – 4pm)
  • Tuesday 17th Jan – GoMobile user group meeting (1 – 3pm)
  • Wednesday 18th Jan – e-submission and e-marking workshops
    • An Introduction To Electronic Submission Of Coursework (9:30 – 11am)
    • The Turnitin Assignment Tool For e-submission (Part 1) And GradeMark For Feedback (Part 2) (12 – 2pm)
    • The Blackboard Assignment Tool For e-submission (Part 1) And Feedback (Part 2) (2:30 – 4pm)
  • Thursday 19th Jan – Student as co-creators (11am – 1pm)
  • Friday 20th Jan – Advanced Twitter (2 – 4pm)

Finally, after these two weeks are a couple of events which might interest you.

  • Wednesday 25th Jan – Building good VITAL modules – a practical session looking at ways of building on the VITAL Baseline to create well-designed modules.
  • Thursday 26th Jan – eLearning Network meeting. In this meeting we will be getting a first look at the new Turnitin Feedback Studio.

All sessions bookable at: https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/cll/booking/

winter-school

Winter School 2017 diary dates

winter-school

A quick post to let you know about the eLearning Unit’s 2017 Winter School. All sessions bookable at: https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/cll/booking/

We’ve scheduled the first full week of sessions as listed here.

  • Monday 9th Jan – Engaging Learners visually in lectures – tools, tips and tricks (1 – 3pm)
  • Tuesday 10th Jan – VITAL Essentials (10am – 12pm)
  • Tuesday 10th Jan – An introduction to Technology Enhanced Learning (13:00 – 16:00)
  • Wednesday 11th Jan – Running webinars and online classrooms with Adobe Connect (10am – 12pm)
  • Thursday 12th Jan – 2nd annual Pedagogic Research Conference (all day)
  • Thursday 12th Jan – Turnitin GradeMark (2 – 3:30pm)
  • Friday 13th Jan – Stream Capture for lecture capture and screencasting (1 – 3pm)

This year we are also running a second week second week of sessions (Monday 16th to Friday 20th January) a number of which are designed to tie-in with the online Bring Your Own Device for Learning 2017 events. All sessions bookable at: https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/cll/booking/

  • Monday 16th Jan – An introduction to Twitter (2 – 4pm)
  • Tuesday 17th Jan – GoMobile user group meeting (1 – 3pm)
  • Wednesday 18th Jan – e-submission and e-marking workshops
    • An Introduction To Electronic Submission Of Coursework (9:30 – 11am)
    • The Turnitin Assignment Tool For e-submission (Part 1) And GradeMark For Feedback (Part 2) (12 – 2pm)
    • The Blackboard Assignment Tool For e-submission (Part 1) And Feedback (Part 2) (2:30 – 4pm)
  • Thursday 19th Jan – Student as co-creators (11am – 1pm)
  • Friday 20th Jan – Advanced Twitter (2 – 4pm)

Finally, after these two weeks are a couple of events which might interest you.

  • Wednesday 25th Jan – Building good VITAL modules – a practical session looking at ways of building on the VITAL Baseline to create well-designed modules.
  • Thursday 26th Jan – eLearning Network meeting. In this meeting we will be getting a first look at the new Turnitin Feedback Studio.

All sessions bookable at: https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/cll/booking/

E-submission and e-marking workshops and support 2017

esubmission long

In support of the University’s e-submission policy for the academic year 2016-17 the eLearning Unit continue to run e-submission and e-marking workshop days throughout the academic year. The days consist of three sessions described below and you are welcome to attend any or all, in whole or in part. We also run tailored school and departmental workshops and if you are considering training or consultancy from the team for e-submission and marking processes and systems, please do get in touch as soon as possible. You will also find dedicated online support resources from the eLearning Unit in the VITAL module VITAL Baseline and support, on which all staff are enrolled.

To search for and book onto any session please see the CLL booking page here. Scheduled e-marking workshop days (all on Wednesdays) for the rest of 2017 are:

  • January 18th
  • February 22nd
  • March 15th
  • April 26th
  • June 14th

Session 1: An introduction to electronic submission of coursework

(Please note this is not a lab-based session). The University is moving to online submission for coursework assignments (see this blog post for more detail on policy). To help staff get an overview of the available tools, understand associated current issues, and plan your own approach to e-submission the eLearning Unit offer this session comparing and discussing the two tools in VITAL for electronic submission, the Blackboard assignment tool and Turnitin.

In this two hour session we will look at:

  • An overview of e-submission in Higher Education and at Liverpool, including the student view
  • A discussion of attendees’ current practice
  • Analysis and examples of the two available assignment submission tools, Blackboard Assignment and Turnitin Assignments and the linked tools available for each.
  • Institutional guidance and key issues for planning assignment submission ‘workflows’.
  • Follow-up support and guidance.

Session 2: Turnitin Assignment tool for e-submission (part 1) and GradeMark for feedback (part 2)

This practical session runs in two parts. After a quick recap of the key differences between Turnitin and Blackboard we will firstly look at the different ways in which the Turnitin Assignment tool can be set up for online assignment submission (part 1 – 45 minutes approx). Then in the optional second part (45 minutes approx) we will try out the GradeMark feedback facilities available, from Criteria marking sheets to inline comments, both in desktop and mobile versions. If you would like to try out the mobile version of the grading tool please could you bring your device. This is available for iOS devices only at the moment and can be found here: https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/turnitin/id657602524?mt=8

Session 3: The Blackboard Assignment tool for e-submission (part 1) and feedback (part 2)

This practical session runs in two parts. After a quick recap of the key differences between Turnitin and Blackboard we will firstly look at the different ways in which the Blackboard Assignment tool can be set up for online assignment submission (part 1 – 45 minutes approx). Then in the optional second part (45 minutes approx) we will try out the grading facilities available, from Criteria marking sheets to inline comments, both in desktop and mobile versions.

Please contact the team if you have any questions about these sessions.

Dan